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DGCA India restricts long over water flights of A320neo aircraft over ongoing engine issues
17 January 2019

DGCA India restricts long over water flights of A320neo aircraft over ongoing engine issues

The Indian Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) restricted operations of A320neo aircraft to Port Blair as a result of ongoing engine issues.

After meeting with A320neo operators GoAir and IndiGo on their ongoing issues with Pratt & Whitney PW1100G engines, DGCA issued four measures. One of these was an operational restriction of flights to Port Blair. This airport is located in the Andaman Islands between India and Thailand. Nearest airports on the Indian mainland are Kolkata at 1305 km and Chennai at 1370 km.
On December 23, 2018, an IndiGo Airbus A320neo aircraft returned to Port Blair when the pilot observed a low oil pressure warning for engine no. 2. The flight crew shut down the engine and returned to land at Port Blair.

Measures published in the Public Notice:

A. Inspection of 3rd stage LPT blade: Carry out inspection of 3rd stage LPT blades as per AMM task 72-53-00-220-801-A at every weekly inspection.

B. Dry Face Seal: Carry out BSI on No. 3 bearing front & AFT carbon seal (DFS) as per P & W special instruction 375F-18 dated 20.12.2018 at –
I. For newer engines, perform BSI at first oil filter change.
II. For engines that have already has the first oil filter change and are less than the 1000 FH of operation time, perform BSI at next opportunity or A check whichever is earlier.

C. Smoke and Odors issues :Create awareness among Cabin and Cockpit Crew about odor / burning smell/smoke (even if slightest) during approach phase and positive reporting to Cockpit crew for necessary action. If any odor/smoke is observed in Air-conditioning PACK Air, Cockpit crew need to identify the source of odor by isolating PACKs one at a time. Log all the cases detecting odours/ smoke in cabin during operation for necessary investigation and rectification. In all odour / smoke cases, engine to be inspected in detail as per AMM and to be used only after rectification of defect.

D. The restriction imposed on flight operations to Port Blair with A320 NEO aircraft.

 

 

EASA extends Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Pakistan and Saudi Arabia

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Pakistan and Saudi Arabia to 11 July 2019.

CZIB-2018-01R2: Airspace of Saudi Arabia – Jeddah Flight Information Region
CZIB-2018-02R2: Airspace of Pakistan – Karachi and Lahore Flight Information Region

 

Aviation Safety Network releases 2018 airliner accident statistics

The Aviation Safety Network today released the 2018 airliner accident statistics showing a total of 15 fatal airliner accidents, resulting in 556 fatalities.

 

Despite several high-profile accidents, the year 2018 was one of the safest years ever for commercial aviation, Aviation Safety Network data show. Yet, last year was worse than the five-year average.

Over the year 2018, the Aviation Safety Network recorded a total of 15 fatal airliner accidents [1], resulting in 556 fatalities. This makes 2018 the third safest year ever by the number of fatal accidents and the ninth safest in terms of fatalities. The safest year in aviation history was 2017 with 10 accidents and 44 lives lost.
Looking at that five-year average of 14 accidents and 480 fatalities, last year was worse on both accounts.

Twelve accidents involved passenger flights, three were cargo flights. Three out of 15 accident airplanes were operated by airlines on the E.U. “blacklist”, up by two compared to 2017.

Given the estimated worldwide air traffic of about 37,800,000 flights, the accident rate is one fatal accident per 2,520,000 flights.
Reflecting on this accident rate, Aviation Safety Network’s CEO Harro Ranter stated that the level of safety has increased significantly: “If the accident rate had remained the same as ten years ago, there would have been 39 fatal accidents last year. At the accident rate of the year 2000, there would have been even 64 fatal accidents. This shows the enormous progress in terms of safety in the past two decades.”

Looking back at the past five years, one thing is clear: Loss of Control accidents are a major safety concern as this type of accident was responsible for at least ten of the 25 worst accidents. Most of those accidents were not survivable.

[1] Statistics are based on all worldwide fatal commercial aircraft accidents (passenger and cargo flights) involving civil aircraft of which the basic model has been certified for carrying 14 or more passengers.
Consequently, the April 11 accident involving an Algerian Air Force IL-76 transport plane that killed 257 is not included. When including military transport aircraft the total number fatalities would be 917 in 25 fatal accidents.

The Aviation Safety Network is an independent organisation located in the Netherlands. Founded in 1996. It has the aim to provide everyone with a (professional) interest in aviation with up-to-date, complete and reliable authoritative information on airliner accidents and safety issues. ASN is an exclusive service of the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF). The figures have been compiled using the airliner accident database of the Aviation Safety Network, the Internet leader in aviation safety information. The Aviation Safety Network uses information from authoritative and official sources.

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Harro Ranter
the Aviation Safety Network
e-mail: hr@aviation-safety.net
twitter: @AviationSafety

 

FAA extends conflict zone Notams on Pakistan airspace by a year

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration extended the Conflict Zone Notam on Pakistani airspace by a year, to 30 December 2019. U.S. pilots are warned about the risks when flying into and out of Pakistan for the potential threat of terrorists using manpads.

FAA extends conflict zone Notam on Afghan airspace by a year

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration extended the Conflict Zone Notam on Afghan airspace by a year, warning American pilots to stay at or above FL330 over Afghanistan.

London-Gatwick Airport operations severely disrupted after drone sightings

London-Gatwick Airport operations were shut down on December 19 and 20 after drones were sighted near the runways.

The first report of two drones came in around 21:00 hours local time on December 19. The airfield was subsequently closed as of 21:03. Later that night, at 03:01 (Dec.20) the airport was opened again.

A further sighting of drones in the vicinity of the airport again forced a closure of the airport as of 03:45 hours. Meanwhile, police were attempting to find the operator(s) of the drones. The airport remained closed since another drone was reported just before 07:00. At 11:45 the airport stated: “All flights remain suspended from Gatwick today, due to ongoing drone activity around the airfield. There is significant disruption, as a result of what appears to be a deliberate attempt to disrupt flights.”

More information:

Report: near collision between A319 and helicopter on approach to Marseille, France

Thai AirAsia X passes IATA safety audit

Thai AirAsia X passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Thai AirAsia X is a Thai long-haul low-fare airline. Its main base is Bangkok-Don Mueang International Airport. It started operating flights in 2014 and currently uses eight Airbus A330-343 aircraft.

The airline is a joint venture of AirAsia X from Malaysia and Thai AirAsia.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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File photo of a Thai AirAsia X Airbus A330-343 (photo: byeangel CC:by-sa)

File photo of a Thai AirAsia X Airbus A330-343 (photo: byeangel CC:by-sa)

FAA extends conflict zone warning on Syrian airspace

Damascus FIR (Syrian airspace)

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration extended the Conflict Zone warning on Syrian airspace until December 30, 2020.

It remains prohibited to conduct flight operations in the Damascus (OSTT) FIR by all U.S. air carriers.

More information

 

Qazaq Air passes IATA safety audit

Qazaq Air passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Qazaq Air is a Kazakh airline, based at Almaty International Airport. It started operating flights in 2015 and currently uses 3 DHC-8-Q400 aircraft on domestic flights.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information: