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AAIB: unstable approach factor in B737-400SF hard landing, Exeter
20 May 2022

AAIB: unstable approach factor in B737-400SF hard landing, Exeter

Air France Boeing 777 pilots made dual control inputs during go-around, BEA says

EASA launches European Information Sharing and Cooperation Platform on Conflict Zones

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) launched the European Information Sharing and Cooperation Platform on Conflict Zones, an initiative which ensures that participating EASA member states and their operators have easy access to the best information when planning flights near or over areas of conflict.

The aim of the Platform is to enable its members to carry out risk assessments and take decisions based on reliable and updated data. In addition, the exchange of information between experts is expected to enhance the confidence of those taking decisions regarding the operation of flights in conflict zone areas. EASA will ensure that the Platform remains a trusted environment and also moderate the content and discussions.

Access to the platform is granted by EASA only to authorised bodies. The platform is fully funded by EASA, meaning that is made available free of charge to eligible interested parties.

EASA publishes Conflict Zone Information Bulletin for Ukraine

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency has published a Conflict Zone Information Bulletin (CZIB) with respect to Ukraine, which is now an active conflict area.

FSF Highlights Persistent Risks in Analysis of 2021 Accident Data

Runway excursions, loss of control‒in flight and controlled flight into terrain accounted for nearly 30 percent of all airliner accidents in 2021, according to Flight Safety Foundation’s 2021 Safety Report. The report, released today, is based on an analysis of preliminary accident data and information contained in the Foundation’s Aviation Safety Network (ASN) database.

Commercial passenger and cargo operations involving aircraft certified to carry at least 14 passengers had 44 accidents in 2021, of which 11 were fatal accidents that resulted in 123 fatalities among passengers and crew, plus one person killed on the ground. Noncommercial operations, such as training, surveying and ferry flights using the same types of aircraft, recorded 26 accidents last year. Nine of those accidents were fatal, resulting in 50 fatalities. Corporate jets were involved in 28 accidents last year. Nine of the accidents were fatal, resulting in 36 fatalities among passengers and crew.

“Loss of control and runway safety‒related events continue to be high-occurrence risk areas that demand attention,” said Foundation President and CEO Dr. Hassan Shahidi. “We urge aviation stakeholders to redouble their efforts to proactively mitigate these and other risks, especially as the aviation sector in regions around the world begins to recover after more than two years of reduced operations.”

In addition, the Foundation’s ongoing assessment of the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on global aviation identified a unique set of challenges for the industry, including changes to the operating environment and regulatory exemptions related to pilot proficiency checks and recency, license renewal and medical certificates, among others. “It is essential that these changes are identified and managed by operators through their safety management systems and by regulatory authorities through state safety programs,” Shahidi said.

The Foundation’s 2021 Safety Report can be downloaded here.

ASN is an exclusive service of the Foundation.

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About Flight Safety Foundation (www.flightsafety.org)
Flight Safety Foundation is an independent, nonprofit, international organization engaged in research, education, advocacy and communications to improve aviation safety. The Foundation’s mission is to connect, influence and lead global aviation safety.

Media Contact:
Frank Jackman
Director, Communications and Research
+1 703.739.6700, ext. 116
jackman@flightsafety.org

Spoiler issue eyed in fatal Dominican Gulfstream G-IV crash

Sky Airline Peru passes IATA safety audit

Sky Airline Peru passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Sky Airline Peru is a Peruvian subsidiary of Sky Airline from Chile. It was founded in 2019.
The airline currently operates Airbus A320neo aircraft, registered to the Chilean parent company.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

A321neo suffers upset in severe icing conditions near Magadan, Russia

Badr Airlines passes IATA safety audit

Badr Airlines from Sudan passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Badr Airlines is an airline that began operating as Sarit Airlines in 1997. In 2005 it was renamed Badr Airlines.
In March 2010 the airline was added to the EU list of airlines banned in the European Union. All Sudanese operators were added because the EU judged the aviation authorities to be insufficiently capable of providing reliable oversight over it’s airlines.

The airline currently operates a fleet of several Boeing 737 (-300, -500, -800) and Embraer ERJ-145 aircraft.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

FAA warns pilots for Ethiopian airspace

The U.S. FAA is advising pilots to exercise caution when operating in Ethiopian airspace below FL290.

The ongoing conflict between opposition groups and military forces poses potential risks to U.S. civil aviation in the Addis Ababa Flight Information Region (FIR) (HAAA), particularly for aircraft on the ground and aircraft operating at low altitudes, including during the arrival and departure phases of flight. For this reason, on 17 November 2021, the FAA published Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) KICZ A0035/21.

Conflict activity in Ethiopia began in November 2020, when the opposition Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), located in the northern Tigray Region along Ethiopia’s border with Eritrea, claimed autonomy from the Ethiopian central government over political differences. The Ethiopian National Defense Forces (ENDF) conducted an offensive to attempt to regain territorial control of the Tigray Region, which included airstrikes against strategic targets in Tigray Defense Forces (TDF)-held areas in the north and the closure of airspace over the conflict area in the Tigray Region.

Although there has been no indication of an intent to threaten civil aviation, U.S. civil aviation operating in or near contested areas in the Addis Ababa FIR (HAAA) at altitudes below FL 290 could be exposed, directly or indirectly, to tactical air operations, ground weapons fire, and/or surface-to-
air fire. The TDF likely possess a variety of anti-aircraft capable weapons, including rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs), anti-tank weapons, low-caliber anti-aircraft artillery, and man-portable air-defense systems (MANPADS). MANPADS may be capable of reaching up to 25,000 feet above ground level.
Additionally, civil aviation operations during low altitude phases of flight could also be affected by unmanned aircraft system (UAS) operations in contested areas and by any potential counter-UAS activity. Lastly, former ENDF SA-3 and SA-2 tactical surface-to-air missile (SAM) sites located in the
Tigray Region, which are now under TDF control, remain a potential risk to civil aviation operating in the airspace over the Tigray Region within which Ethiopia has restricted flight operations.