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EASA extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia
24 October 2018

EASA extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia to 24 April 2019.

 

China United Airlines and Canaryfly pass IATA safety audit

China United Airlines and Canaryfly both passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

China United Airlines is a Chinese budget carrier based at Beijing Nanyuan Airport. It started operating flights in 1986 as a civil branch of the Chinese Army and was relaunched in 2005 with Shanghai Airlines as its largest stakeholder.
The airline now operates eight Boeing 737-700’s and 36 Boeing 737-800’s.

Canaryfly is a Spanish regional airline that operates out of Gran Canaria Airport, Canary Islands. The airline was established in 2010 and operates five ATR 72-500 turboprops.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Air Guilin passes IATA safety audit

Air Guilin passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Air Guilin is a Chinese airline, based at Guilin Liangjiang International Airport. It started operating flights in 2016 and currently uses 3 Airbus A319-100 aircraft and 8 Airbus A320-200s.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

AirAsia passes IATA safety audit

AirAsia passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

AirAsia is a Malaysian low-cost airline. Its main base is Kuala Lumpur International Airport. It started operating flights in 1996 and currently uses 70 Airbus A320-200 aircraft and 21 Airbus A320neos .

The airline’s affiliates AirAsia X and Indonesia AirAsia are both IOSA registered as well.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Hong Kong Air Cargo passes IATA safety audit

Hong Kong Air Cargo passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Hong Kong Air Cargo is a cargo airline based at Hong Kong Chek Lap Kok International Airport. The airline is a subsidiary of Hong Kong Airlines. It started operating in 2016 and uses three Airbus A330-200F aircraft.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

JU-Air will resume Ju-52 flights on 17 August with government-mandated safety measures in place

Swiss operator JU-Air stated that it would resume flights using their historic Junkers Ju-52/3m aircraft starting August 17, 2018.

Operations had been voluntarily suspended after the fatal accident on August 4 in which all 20 occupants were killed. The Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA) allows operations to be conducted since the investigation by the STSB has not yet brought to light any technical problems with the accident aircraft.

However, JU-Air first has to comply with the precautionary measures of the FOCA to commence flight operations. First, the FOCA requires that, for the time being, a minimum altitude above the legal minimum altitude be maintained. Secondly, JU-Air’s aircraft now have to carry a GPS data recorder that records every flight and allows subsequent assessment of the route. Third, the passengers should also remain strapped during the flight and not be able to circulate freely in the aircraft. This also applies to visits to the cockpit during the flight.

These precautionary measures must be implemented by JU-Air before commencing flight operations. JU-Air has already assured the FOCA that it will implement these requirements accordingly.

 

Indonesia AirAsia and Ravn Alaska pass IATA safety audit

Indonesia AirAsia and Ravn Alaska both passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Indonesia AirAsia is an Indonesian associate carrier of Malaysian low-fare airline AirAsia. Its main base is Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta. It started operating flights in 2005 and uses eighteen Airbus A320-200 aircraft.
The airline suffered one accident. In December 2014 all 162 on board flight QZ8501 were killed when the aircraft crashed into the Karimata Strait following a loss of control.
Between July 2007 and July 2010 Indonesia  AirAsia was on the EU list of banned air carriers.

Ravn Alaska (corporate name Corvus Airlines) is a regional airline that specializes in serving the small communities in the US state of Alaska. It was founded in 1948 as Economy Helicopters and was later renamed Era Helicopters. In 1988, Era Helicopters formally changed its name to Era Aviation. The airline later split up the helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft divisions. The fixed-wing airline became Era Alaska, which changed its name to Ravn Alaska in 2014. It currently operates a fleet of ten de Havilland Canada DHC-8-100’s.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Nippon Cargo disciplined for maintenance irregularities

The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism faulted Nippon Cargo Airlines for inadequate aircraft maintenance, according to a statement made by the ministry.

The Japan News reports that disciplinary action was taken against Nippon Cargo Airlines for its inadequate aircraft maintenance and failure to report accidents, as well as the manipulation of maintenance records. The airline is said to have tried to cover up the violations.

Eight maintenance staff members are said to have been involved in three cases of data falsification. In one of them, a maintenance manager and a mechanic manipulated an airplane’s lubricating oil level to avoid a mandatory checkup at Narita International Airport in April 2018. Between August 2013 and May 2018, there also were inadequate maintenance cases including the testing of aircraft control functions by an unqualified worker.

As a result, the ministry stripped the company of its exemption from annual safety inspections.

Industry warning for Super Absorbant Polymers (SAP) jet fuel contamination after Boeing 777 incident

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) issued a safety information bulletin, warning for Super Absorbant Polymers (SAP) contamination of jet fuel, following a recent Bangladesh Boeing 777 engine failure incident.

In June 2016, a Bangladesh Biman Boeing 777-300ER suffered an engine failure when Low Pressure Turbine vanes broke following a small combustion during takeoff from Dhaka Airport, Banglades.  The takeoff was aborted.

An investigation revealed that fuel nozzles were contaminated by SAPs. These apparently entered the fuel tank during refueling.

EASA recommends aircraft operators to be aware that SAP in jet fuel can cause engine in-flight shutdowns or operational problems and are advised to report events of SAP contamination to the engine and aircraft type certificate holders, to the fueling service provider and to the national aviation authorities. Competent authorities are advised to take this issue into account during their oversight activities.

EASA updated and extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Pakistan and Saudi Arabia

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Pakistan and Saudi Arabia to 9 January 2019.

CZIB-2018-01R1: Airspace of Saudi Arabia – Jeddah Flight Information Region
CZIB-2018-02R1: Airspace of Pakistan – Karachi and Lahore Flight Information Region