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CAO Iran lifts suspension of ATR 72-200 and -500 aircraft, grounded following recent accident
18 March 2018

CAO Iran lifts suspension of ATR 72-200 and -500 aircraft, grounded following recent accident

The Civil Aviation Organization of Islamic Republic of Iran (CAO.IRI) lifted the suspension of operations involving ATR 72-200 and -500 aircraft in the country.

Iran Aseman Airlines was forced to suspend operations with its three ATR 72-212 aircraft and two ATR 72-500’s on February 22, in the wake of the fatal accident of Iran Aseman Airlines flight 3704 on February 18.

This suspension was lifted on March 18.

 

DGCA India grounds 11 Airbus A320neo aircraft over PW1000G engine issues

Following a series of technical issues with Airbus’ A320 neo aircraft in India, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) ordered the grounding of 11 of the aircraft on March 13, 2018.

On February 9, 2018, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)  issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive (AD 2018-0041-E) with an operational limitation on certain Airbus A320neo and A321 neo aircraft fitted with PW1000G engines. This action was taken following several occurrences of engine in-flight shut-down (IFSD) and Rejected Take-Off (RTO). The affected engines more susceptible to IFSD, have high pressure compressor aft hub modification embodied from ESN P770450.
EASA among others ordered not to operate an aeroplane having two affected engines installed.

Following three recent A320neo IFSD incidents in India, DGCA decided to take the EASA AD a step further by grounding all aircraft with affected engines as of March 13. Out of the 11 aircraft that have been grounded, 8 are operated by IndiGo and 3 by GoAir.

On top of the DGCA decision, a public interest litigation was filed at the Bombay High Court to ground all PW1000G-powered A320neo’s, not just the ones with the affected engines. This was dismissed by the High Court on March 17, but it did direct the DGCA to ascertain whether all the A320neo’s operational in India, are safe for flight operations.

Transport Canada suspends Orca Airways’ Air Operator Certificate over safety issues

On March 15, Transport Canada suspended Orca Airways Air Operator Certificate (AOC) over safety issues.

Transport Canada reported in a statement that it took this enforcement action due to Orca Airways’ repeated non-compliance with aviation safety regulations.
The department identified several areas where the company is not meeting regulatory requirements including maintenance, operational control, documentation, and quality assurance.

Transport Canada will not allow Orca Airways to resume its commercial air service until it proves it can keep its operations consistently compliant with aviation safety regulations.

The airline provides scheduled commercial service, cargo, and charter services out of Vancouver, Canada, using a fleet of Piper PA-31-350 Chieftains, Swearingen Merlin IV/Metroliners, and a Beechcraft 100 King Air.

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Global Africa Aviation and SaudiGulf Airlines pass IATA safety audit

Global Africa Aviation of Zimbabwe and SaudiGulf Airlines of Saudi Arabia pass IATA safety audit both passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Global Africa Aviation was founded in 2014 and operates two McDonnell Douglas MD-11F cargo aircraft.

SaudiGulf Airlines started operating flights in 2016 and uses four newly delivered Airbus A320-232 aircraft, connecting Damman, Jeddah, Riyadh, Abha and Dubai.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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Air Manas passes IATA safety audit

Kyrgyz airline Air Manas passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline was founded in 2006 and started low cost operations in December 2009. It currently operates a Boeing 737-400 and a Boeing 737-800. Both aircraft were formerly operated by Turkish airline Pegasus, which owns 49% of Air Manas.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

Despite passing the IOSA audit, the airline remains on the E.U. Air Safety List, a list of airlines which are banned from operating within the European Union. Air Manas is banned, along with all other air carriers certified by the authorities with responsibility for regulatory oversight of the Kyrgyz Republic.

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EASA extends validity of conflict zone warnings for Kenya, Mali, and Yemen to 31 August 2018

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Kenya, Mali, Yemen to 31 August 2018.

 

Transport Canada suspended Island Express Air’s AOC over safety issues, in the wake of Beech 100 accident

Transport Canada suspended Island Express Air’s Air Operator Certificate (AOC) over safety issues.

The suspension, initiated on February 28, prohibits the company from providing commercial air services. The department took this action in the interest of public safety due to the airline’s February 23, 2018 accident in Abbotsford, BC and its contraventions of the Canadian Aviation Regulations. The accident involved a Beechcraft B100 King Air, that suffered a runway excursion on takeoff.

Transport Canada stated that, “in light of these threats to public safety, [it] will not allow Island Express Air to resume its commercial air service until it proves it can keep its operations consistently compliant with aviation safety regulations.”

The department will continue to monitor Island Express Air’s actions as the company works towards compliance with aviation safety regulations.

Iran suspends operations with ATR 72-200 and -500 aircraft in wake of fatal accident

The Civil Aviation Organization of Islamic Republic of Iran (CAO.IRI) reported that operations involving ATR 72-200 and -500 aircraft were suspended in the country.

While the investigation into the fatal accident of Iran Aseman Airlines flight 3704 on February 18, is ongoing, it was decided to suspend operations of the type until further notice. The decision was published on February 22, 2018.

The only operator of this aircraft type in Iran is Iran Aseman Airlines. The airline owns three ATR 72-212 aircraft and two ATR 72-500’s.
Iran Air has recently taken delivery of brand new ATR 72-600 aircraft. Flights with these aircraft are not suspended.

 

Bul Air passes IATA safety audit

Bulgarian airline Bul Air passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline was founded in 2015 and operates charter flights with Boeing 737-300 aircraft.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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Lithuanian GetJet Airlines passes IATA safety audit

The Lithuanian airline GetJet Airlines passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline was founded in 2016 and offers ACMI aircraft lease.  The fleet currently consists of two Airbus A320’s, two Boeing 737-300’s and four Boeing 737-400’s.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information: