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Cuban authorities ground Cubana’s Antonov An-158 fleet over safety issues
3 May 2018

Cuban authorities ground Cubana’s Antonov An-158 fleet over safety issues

File photo of An-158 (photo CC:by-sa Oleg V. Belyakov – AirTeamImages)

Cuban aviation authorities ordered the grounding of all Antonov An-158 aircraft in the country over safety fears due to a lack of spare parts.

The Instituto de Aeronáutica Civil de Cuba (IACC) issued the order to Cubana de Aviacion to ground its fleet of six An-158 aircraft as of May 3, 2018.
IACC cites technical problems with a.o. electrical systems and hydraulics. An example is given of an occurrence in the last three months in which abnormal engine operation temperatures were noted on the Ivchenko-Progress D-436 engine. Cubana received orders by Antonov to ground one specific aircraft, CU-T1716, because of defects in the aircraft’s engines.

 

EASA updated and extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for South Sudan and North Korea

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for South Sudan and North Korea to 25 October 2018.

CZIB-2018-03: Airspace of South Sudan
CZIB-2017-06R2: Airspace of North Korea – Pyongyang Flight Information Region

 

EASA updated and extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia to 23 October 2018.

 

EASA amends conflict zone warning for Iraqi airspace

The Baghdad FIR roughly follows the Iraqi border

The European EASA issued an amended warning on Iraqi airspace.
On April 13, EASA issued Conflict Zone Information Bulletin CZIB 2017-04R2. The risk is described as:

Due to the presence of various weaponry including MANPADS (man-portable air-defence systems), it is advised to be 
cautious with the risk associated to civil aviation. The risk to operations at all altitudes is assessed to be HIGH, 
except for airways UM688 and UM860. The highest airspace risk is estimated to be along the entire Iraq/Syrian border.

The validity is extended until 13 October 2018.

 

FAA revokes Air America’s air carrier certificate over safety issues

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an Emergency Order of Revocation against Air America, Inc. of Carolina, Puerto Rico, for allegedly conducting passenger-carrying flights using a pilot who had not received enough rest, using an unqualified pilot, operating aircraft when they were overweight and not properly loaded, and failing to provide pilot records.

The FAA alleges that in March and June 2017, the company’s director of operations served as pilot in command of multiple passenger-carrying flights when he had not received required rest. The FAA further alleges the director of operations falsely recorded that he had provided required ground and flight training to a new pilot, when he had in fact not provided that training.

As a result, the new pilot was not qualified to serve as pilot in command for Air America, the FAA alleges. Nevertheless, he served as pilot in command on at least eight passenger-carrying flights between April 23 and June 3, 2017

The FAA further alleges the unqualified pilot made improper weight and balance calculations on three flights in May and June 2017. Consequently, the aircraft were overweight and improperly loaded. The twin-engine Piper PA-23-250 Aztec E he was flying crashed on June 3, 2017, killing one of the passengers.

The FAA also alleges that Air America was unable to provide pilot flight and duty records to an FAA inspector who requested them on June 5, 2017. As of February 2018, the company still had not provided those records.

The FAA alleges Air America’s actions were careless and reckless, and its numerous violations of the Federal Aviation Regulations pose a threat to safety in air commerce or air transportation.

According to the FAA aircraft register, the airline also operates a Britten-Norman BN-2A Islander, N7049T and another PA-23 Aztec, N2395Z.

 

Cebu Pacific Air passes IATA safety audit

Philippine airline Cebu Pacific Air passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Cebu Pacific commenced operations in 1996. It operates a fleet of 35 Airbus A320’s, one A321, eight A330-300’s and 17 ATR 72’s on domestic and regional routes.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

FAA extends security notice for flights over Egypt Sinai Peninsula

Sinai Peninsula (FAA)

Sinai Peninsula (FAA)

The United States FAA extended a security warning for the Egypt Sinai Peninsula by another year due to continuing concern for flight safety.

The initial Notam was issued on March 30, 2015, based on the FAA’s assessment that international civil air routes that transit the Cairo (HECC) Flight Information Region (FIR) over the Sinai Peninsula and aircraft operating to and from Sinai airports are at risk from potential extremist attacks involving antiaircraft weapons, to include Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS), small arms fire, and indirect fire from mortars and rockets targeting Sinai airports.

The FAA reports that the Islamic State in Iraq and ash-Sham in the Sinai (ISIS-Sinai), an Egypt-based affiliate of ISIS, continues to conduct attacks in northern and southern Sinai, some of which demonstrate their capability and intent to target civil aviation. In February 2017, ISIS-Sinai focused indirect fire on Eilat, Israel using rockets fired from southern Sinai.

Based on this information, the FAA continues to advise U.S. airlines and operators to avoid flying below FL260 in this area.

More information:

Petroleum Air Services passes IATA safety audit

Egyptian airline Petroleum Air Service (PAS) passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

PAS was founded in 1982 to provide oil industry support services and charter flights in Egypt. It operates a fleet of two CRJ-900’s and five DHC-8-300’s.

In addition the airline has a large number of helicopters: Bell 206, Bell 212, Bell 412, AgustaWestland AW139, and Eurocopter EC-135’s.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Joon and Germania Flug pass IATA safety audit

French airline Joon and Germania Flug (Switzerland) both passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Germania Flug was founded in cooperation with German airline Germania and started operations in March 2015. It flies two Airbus A319 aircraft and a single Airbus A321.

Joon is a French subsidiary of Air France that started operating flights in December 2017 and uses seven Airbus A320-214 and two A321-212’s. All were moved from to Joon from Air France.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Twelve years ago today the European Commission adopted the first list of airlines, banned in the EU

Twelve years ago today the European Commission adopted the first EU list of airlines which are banned in the European Union.

Plans were drawn for an EU initiative in August 2005. At the time several European countries, like the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Switzerland had started their own blacklists. Britain was the first to publish a list, in January 2004. This action was taken in the wake of an accident involving a Flash Airlines Boeing 737-300 charter flight in Egypt that killed all aboard, including 133 French holidaymakers. Although the carrier had already been banned in Switzerland, the ban had not been publicized.

The first EU-‘blacklist’,  published on 22 March 2005, contained 92 airlines facing a complete ban and 3 facing operational restrictions.
Over the course of the last twelve years, 29 updates were published, covering a total of over 
650 airlines.

The current list contains a total of 178 airlines that are banned from EU skies. An additional six airlines are subject to operational restrictions and can only fly to the EU with specific aircraft types.

Of these 184 airlines, 7 have passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA): Air Koryo, Air Manas, Iran Air, Iran Aseman Airlines, Nova Airways, TAAG Angola Airlines, and Wings Air.

Longest & shortest

A total of twenty airlines have been on the list since the first edition. Buraq Air from Libya, on the other hand, was removed from the first edition after 90 days.