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FAA extends warning for unannounced North Korean missile tests in Pyongyang FIR
27 May 2017

FAA extends warning for unannounced North Korean missile tests in Pyongyang FIR

Pyongyang FIR (ZKKP) with 132° boundary

Pyongyang FIR (ZKKP) with 132° boundary

The U.S. FAA has extended by a year (until 27 May 2018) their advise to U.S. airlines to exercise caution when flying in the eastern part of North Korean airspace due to possible missile test launches. 

North Korea continues to conduct unannounced launches of short range and intermediate-range ballistic missiles that have the ability to travel beyond 132 degrees east longitude.

For this reason the FAA had already prohibited operations of U.S. aircraft from flying in the Pyongyang FIR (ZKKP) west of 132 degrees east longitude. U.S. operators are advised to use caution when planning for and operating in and around the Pyongyang FIR east of 132 degrees east longitude.

More information:

J-Air (Japan) and Mann Yadanarpon Airlines (Myanmar) pass IATA safety audit

J-Air ERJ-170 (photo: lasta29)

The Japanese airline J-Air and Mann Yadanarpon Airlines from Myanmar both passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

J-Air is wholly owned regional subsidiary of Japan Airlines – JAL and commenced operations in 1996 as a regional operator. The airline now flies domestic services within Japan with a fleet of 28  aircraft: Five CRJ-200ER jets, 17 Embraer ERJ-170’s and six ERJ-190’s.

Mann Yadanarpon Airlines is a privately owned domestic airline that began operarions in 2014 out of Mandalay Airport, Myanmar. The airline currently operates two ATR 72-600 turboprops.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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EU clears Benin, Mozambique from Air Safety List and adds four airlines

All air carriers from Benin and Mozambique are removed from the EU Air Safety List, while four individual airlines were added.

The European Commission updated the EU Air Safety List, the list of non-European airlines that do not meet international safety standards, and removed all airlines certified in Benin and Mozambique from the list, following further improvements to the aviation safety situation in these countries.
On the other hand, the airlines Med-View (Nigeria), Mustique Airways (St. Vincent and the Grenadines), Aviation Company Urga (Ukraine) and Air Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe) were added to the list due to unaddressed safety deficiencies that were detected by the European Aviation Safety Agency during the assessment for a third country operator authorisation.

Med-View operated a regular service between Lagos and London-Gatwick using a Nigerian registered Boeing 767-300 until November 13, 2016. Effective November 2 the airline began using a Boeing 747-400 operated by Air Atlanta Icelandic.  Air Urga operated on occasional charter flights from Ukraine to EU states. Mustique Airways operated occasional flights to Martinique (France).

Despite the fact that Med-View Airlines was added to the ‘black list’, the airline is on IATA’s IOSA registry. The IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) program is an international evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline.

Following the update, a total of 181 airlines are banned from EU skies:
174 airlines certified in 16 states, due to a lack of safety oversight by the aviation authorities from these states.
Seven individual airlines, based on safety concerns with regard to these airlines themselves: Iran Aseman Airlines (Iran), Iraqi Airways (Iraq) and Blue Wing Airlines (Suriname), Med-View Airlines (Nigeria), Mustique Airways (St Vincent and the Grenadines), Aviation Company Urga (Ukraine) and Air Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe).
An additional six airlines are subject to operational restrictions and can only fly to the EU with specific aircraft types: Afrijet and Nouvelle Air Affaires SN2AG (Gabon), Air Koryo (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), Air Service Comores (the Comoros), Iran Air (Iran) and TAAG Angola Airlines (Angola).

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FAA extends prohibition for U.S. airlines from flying over Iraq

The Baghdad FIR roughly follows the Iraqi border

Due to continued concerns regarding the safety of aircraft in the Baghdad Flight Information Region (FIR), the FAA decided to extend the prohibition for U.S. airlines from flying over Iraq.

The Notam reads as follows:

KICZ A0010/17 - SECURITY..UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FLIGHT PROHIBITION FOR
 IRAQ BAGHDAD (ORBB) FLIGHT INFORMATION REGION
 DUE TO THE HAZARDOUS SITUATION CREATED BY THE ONGOING FIGHTING AND INSTABILITY IN
 IRAQ, ALL FLIGHT OPERATIONS IN THE BAGHDAD (ORBB) FLIGHT INFORMATION REGION (FIR) BY THE
 PERSONS DESCRIBED IN PARAGRAPH A (APPLICABILITY) ARE PROHIBITED. THIS NOTAM IS AN
 EMERGENCY ORDER ISSUED UNDER 49 USC 40113(A) AND 46105(C). THIS NOTAM WILL REMAIN IN
 EFFECT UNTIL SUCH TIME AS TITLE 14, CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS, SECTION 91.1605, SPECIAL
 FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATION NO. 77- PROHIBITION AGAINST CERTAIN FLIGHTS IN THE BAGHDAD
 (ORBB) FLIGHT INFORMATION REGION (FIR) IS REISSUED.
 
A. APPLICABILITY. THIS NOTAM APPLIES TO: ALL U.S. AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL
 OPERATORS; ALL PERSONS EXERCISING THE PRIVILEGES OF AN AIRMAN CERTIFICATE ISSUED BY
 THE FAA, EXCEPT SUCH PERSONS OPERATING U.S.‐REGISTERED AIRCRAFT FOR A FOREIGN AIR
 CARRIER; AND ALL OPERATORS OF AIRCRAFT REGISTERED IN THE UNITED STATES, EXCEPT WHERE
 THE OPERATOR OF SUCH AIRCRAFT IS A FOREIGN AIR CARRIER.

B. PERMITTED OPERATIONS. THIS NOTAM DOES NOT PROHIBIT PERSONS DESCRIBED IN PARAGRAPH
 A (APPLICABILITY) FROM CONDUCTING FLIGHT OPERATIONS IN THE BAGHDAD FIR (ORBB) WHEN
 SUCH OPERATIONS ARE AUTHORIZED EITHER BY ANOTHER AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATES
 GOVERNMENT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE FAA OR BY A DEVIATION, EXEMPTION, OR OTHER
 AUTHORIZATION ISSUED BY THE FAA ADMINISTRATOR. OPERATORS MUST CALL THE FAA
 WASHINGTON OPERATIONS CENTER AT 202-267-3333 TO INITIATE COORDINATION FOR FAA
 AUTHORIZATION OF OPERATIONS.
 
C. EMERGENCY SITUATIONS. IN AN EMERGENCY THAT REQUIRES IMMEDIATE DECISION AND
 ACTION FOR THE SAFETY OF THE FLIGHT, THE PILOT IN COMMAND OF AN AIRCRAFT MAY
 DEVIATE FROM THIS NOTAM TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED BY THAT EMERGENCY.
 SFC - - UNL 10 MAY 13:52 2017 UNTIL PERM. CREATED: 10 MAY 14:05 2017

 

Yangtze River Airlines passes IATA safety audit

File photo of a Yangtze River Boeing 747-400F at Brussel Airport (photo: H.Ranter/ASN)

The Chinese airline Yangtze River Airlines passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline commenced operations in 2003 as a cargo operator added passenger flights in 2015. It operates a fleet of ten Boeing 737-300SF’s, three Boeing 737-400SF’s, six Boeing 737-800 passenger aircraft and three Boeing 747-400F’s. .
The airline’s parent company, Hainan Airlines, is also an IOSA registered airline.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.
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EASA issues Conflict Zone Information Bulletin regarding North Korean airspace

EASA issued a Conflict Zone Information Bulletin regarding North Korean airspace.

Referring to French and German aeronautical publications, EASA recommends operators that they should “take this information and any other relevant information into account in their own risk assessments, alongside any available guidance or directions from their national authority as appropriate.”

The German Notam, which is in force since at least July 2016, states:

FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY ADVISES GERMAN OPERATORS NOT TO PLAN AND 
CONDUCT FLIGHTS WITHIN FIR PYONGYANG (ZKKP) INCLUDING TAKE OFF AND 
LANDINGS AT ALL AIRPORTS. POTENTIAL RISK TO AVIATION FROM DEDICATED 
GROUND TO GROUND BALLISTIC WEAPONRY TEST FIRINGS WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE.

Source:

U.S. pilot sentenced to 10 months for operating aircraft without license

A 37-year old American who admitted that he illegally piloted private jet airplanes with passengers onboard without having a valid pilot’s license was sentenced to 10 months in U.S. federal prison.

According to court documents, the pilot operated aircraft with passengers on a number of occasions without the proper authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration. In January 2015, he piloted a Cessna Citation turbojet-powered aircraft, with paying passengers, from Santa Monica to Phoenix prior to receiving any type of airman’s certificate for turbojet-powered aircraft.

The following month, he obtained an airman’s certificate that authorized him to be a second-in-command pilot on a Cessna Citation turbojet-powered aircraft, but he continued to operate the Cessna Citation as a sole pilot with passengers. For example, in April 2015, he piloted a Cessna Citation from Burbank to Bermuda Dunes and from Santa Monica to Bentonville, Arkansas.

Furthermore, on April 8, 2016, he was the sole pilot of a Dassault Falcon 10 turbojet-powered aircraft, with passengers on board, that flew from Van Nuys to Las Vegas, Nevada. At this time, he was not certified to fly the Falcon 10, and the FAA had revoked all of his airman certificates.

This case was investigated by the Department of Transportation – Office of Inspector General, with assistance by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:

West Air (China) passes IATA safety audit

The Chinese low-cost airline West Air passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline commenced operations in 2010 and operates a fleet of four Airbus A319’s, and 23 Airbus A320’s. It services some 18 cities in China out of Chongqing Jiangbei International Airport, as well international destinations in Japan, Philippines and Singapore.
The airline’s parent company, Hainan Airlines, is also an IOSA registered airline.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.
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Air Peace passes IATA safety audit

The private Nigerian airline Air Peace passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline was founded in 2013 and operates a fleet of four Boeing 737-300’s, five Boeing 737-500’s and one Dornier 328JET. It services cities in Nigeria as well as Accra in Ghana.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.
More information:

FAA extends security notice for flights over Egypt Sinai Peninsula

Sinai Peninsula (FAA)

Sinai Peninsula (FAA)

The United States FAA extended a security warning for the Egypt Sinai Peninsula by another year due to continuing concern for flight safety.

The initial Notam was issued on March 30, 2015, based on the FAA’s assessment that international civil air routes that transit the Cairo (HECC) Flight Information Region (FIR) over the Sinai Peninsula and aircraft operating to and from Sinai airports are at risk from potential extremist attacks involving antiaircraft weapons, to include Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS), small arms fire, and indirect fire from mortars and rockets targeting Sinai airports.

The FAA reports that the Islamic State in Iraq and ash-Sham in the Sinai (ISIS-Sinai), an Egypt-based affiliate of ISIS, continues to conduct attacks in northern and southern Sinai, some of which demonstrate their capability and intent to target civil aviation. In February 2017, ISIS-Sinai focused indirect fire on Eilat, Israel using rockets fired from southern Sinai.

Based on this information, the FAA continues to advise U.S. airlines and operators to avoid flying below FL260 in this area.

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