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Office of Inspector General to audit FAA’s maintenance oversight of American Airlines, Allegiant
10 May 2018

Office of Inspector General to audit FAA’s maintenance oversight of American Airlines, Allegiant

The U.S. Office of Inspector General stated that it will investigate the FAA’s maintenance oversight of American Airlines and Allegiant.

In June 2017, the Department of Transportation’s Office of Inspector General announced a review of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) oversight of air carrier maintenance.

Based on their initial audit work and additional congressional requests, it was decided to adjust the scope of this audit. OIG states that the objectives now are to assess FAA’s processes for investigating allegations of improper maintenance practices at two carriers, Allegiant Air and American Airlines. Specifically, to (1) examine FAA’s independent reviews, complaints to the FAA hotline, and other sources to see whether inspectors conducting routine surveillance of Allegiant and American Airlines found similar discrepancies and (2) determine whether FAA ensures that Allegiant and American Airlines implement effective corrective actions to address the root causes of maintenance problems.

 

Eurowings Europe passes IATA safety audit

Austrian airline Eurowings Europe passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Eurowings Europe commenced operations in 2016. It operates a six Airbus A319 and six Airbus A320 aircraft om two bases in Austria. The airline is a subsidiary of Lufthansa Group.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Transport Canada reinstates West Wind Aviation’s AOC after suspension following accident

Transport Canada has reinstated West Wind Aviation’s Air Operator Certificate (AOC) for its commuter operations after a review of the company’s operations.

The reinstatement is effective immediately and allows the company to provide commercial air service in Canada.

West Wind Aviation has addressed Transport Canada’s concerns regarding the deficiencies in its Operational Control System. Transport Canada states it will closely monitor West Wind Aviation to verify that the company remains compliant with aviation safety regulations.

On December 22, 2017, Transport Canada suspended West Wind Aviation’s AOC because of deficiencies in the company’s Operational Control System that were discovered during an inspection following a December 13 fatal accident involving an ATR 42.

FAA issues emergency order of suspension for Island Airlines

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an Emergency Order of Suspension against Island Airlines, LLC, of the U.S. Virgin Islands, for not allowing the agency to inspect the company’s aircraft and records.

On March 14, 2017, the FAA received information alleging the St. Croix-based company was operating a Beech B200 while an inspection was overdue for one of its engines. Between March 15, 2017 and Nov. 29, 2017, the FAA tried numerous times to contact Island Airlines by email and certified letters to alert the company it was opening an investigation and to schedule an inspection of its aircraft and records.

Additionally, the FAA sent inspectors to St. Croix to inspect Island Airlines’ records and aircraft in April 2017 and November 2017.

The company did not respond to the FAA’s various communications and did not make a representative available to allow the inspectors access to its operations base, the FAA alleges.

Because Island Airlines did not allow access to its operations base for inspection of its records and aircraft, the FAA cannot verify the company’s qualifications to hold an Air Carrier Certificate, the agency alleges. The FAA has determined that the safety of the flying public requires the suspension of Island Airlines’ certificate until it allows inspection of its records and aircraft to establish the company’s qualifications.

The Emergency Order of Suspension is effective immediately, and the company cannot conduct operations while the order is in effect. Island Air surrendered its certificate

More info:

Gowair passes IATA safety audit

Spanish airline Gowair passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Gowair commenced operations in 2017. It operates a single Airbus A320 on charter flights in Europe and for ACMI leases to other airlines.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Cuban authorities ground Cubana’s Antonov An-158 fleet over safety issues

File photo of An-158 (photo CC:by-sa Oleg V. Belyakov – AirTeamImages)

Cuban aviation authorities ordered the grounding of all Antonov An-158 aircraft in the country over safety fears due to a lack of spare parts.

The Instituto de Aeronáutica Civil de Cuba (IACC) issued the order to Cubana de Aviacion to ground its fleet of six An-158 aircraft as of May 3, 2018.
IACC cites technical problems with a.o. electrical systems and hydraulics. An example is given of an occurrence in the last three months in which abnormal engine operation temperatures were noted on the Ivchenko-Progress D-436 engine. Cubana received orders by Antonov to ground one specific aircraft, CU-T1716, because of defects in the aircraft’s engines.

 

EASA updated and extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for South Sudan and North Korea

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for South Sudan and North Korea to 25 October 2018.

CZIB-2018-03: Airspace of South Sudan
CZIB-2017-06R2: Airspace of North Korea – Pyongyang Flight Information Region

 

EASA updated and extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia to 23 October 2018.

 

EASA amends conflict zone warning for Iraqi airspace

The Baghdad FIR roughly follows the Iraqi border

The European EASA issued an amended warning on Iraqi airspace.
On April 13, EASA issued Conflict Zone Information Bulletin CZIB 2017-04R2. The risk is described as:

Due to the presence of various weaponry including MANPADS (man-portable air-defence systems), it is advised to be 
cautious with the risk associated to civil aviation. The risk to operations at all altitudes is assessed to be HIGH, 
except for airways UM688 and UM860. The highest airspace risk is estimated to be along the entire Iraq/Syrian border.

The validity is extended until 13 October 2018.

 

FAA revokes Air America’s air carrier certificate over safety issues

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an Emergency Order of Revocation against Air America, Inc. of Carolina, Puerto Rico, for allegedly conducting passenger-carrying flights using a pilot who had not received enough rest, using an unqualified pilot, operating aircraft when they were overweight and not properly loaded, and failing to provide pilot records.

The FAA alleges that in March and June 2017, the company’s director of operations served as pilot in command of multiple passenger-carrying flights when he had not received required rest. The FAA further alleges the director of operations falsely recorded that he had provided required ground and flight training to a new pilot, when he had in fact not provided that training.

As a result, the new pilot was not qualified to serve as pilot in command for Air America, the FAA alleges. Nevertheless, he served as pilot in command on at least eight passenger-carrying flights between April 23 and June 3, 2017

The FAA further alleges the unqualified pilot made improper weight and balance calculations on three flights in May and June 2017. Consequently, the aircraft were overweight and improperly loaded. The twin-engine Piper PA-23-250 Aztec E he was flying crashed on June 3, 2017, killing one of the passengers.

The FAA also alleges that Air America was unable to provide pilot flight and duty records to an FAA inspector who requested them on June 5, 2017. As of February 2018, the company still had not provided those records.

The FAA alleges Air America’s actions were careless and reckless, and its numerous violations of the Federal Aviation Regulations pose a threat to safety in air commerce or air transportation.

According to the FAA aircraft register, the airline also operates a Britten-Norman BN-2A Islander, N7049T and another PA-23 Aztec, N2395Z.