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Wings Air passes IATA safety audit
19 July 2017

Wings Air passes IATA safety audit

The Indonesian airline Wings Air passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline, formally named Wings Abadi Airlines,  commenced operations in 2003 as a regional wholly owned subsidiary of Lion Air. The airline currently operates a fleet of 20 ATR 72-500 and 31 ATR 72-600 aircraft.

Wings Air was added to the  EU Air Safety List  on 4 July 2007, banning it from operating in Europe. By July 2017 it has not yet been removed from that list.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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FAA proposes $285,800 civil penalty against Exec 1 Aviation

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes a $285,800 civil penalty against Exec 1 Aviation of Ankeny, Iowa, for allegedly using unqualified pilots on multiple passenger-carrying flights.

The FAA alleges that Exec 1 conducted a total of 100 flights using Cessna 500 Citation jet aircraft with 12 unqualified pilots. Seventy-nine of the flights, which occurred during a 30-day period in May and June 2015, had revenue-paying passengers on board the aircraft. The flights took place at airports throughout the U.S.

The FAA alleges the pilots were unqualified because they had failed to complete required initial or recurrent training. The training subjects included cold weather operations, engine inoperative procedures, and abnormal and emergency procedures, among other things.

Exec 1 has 30 days from receipt of the FAA’s enforcement letter to respond to the agency.

Air Cote d’Ivoire and Cambodia Angkor Air pass IATA safety audit

Air Cote d’Ivoire and Cambodia Angkor Air both passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Air Cote d’Ivoire, the flag carrier of Ivory Coast, commenced operations in 2012. The airline currently operates a fleet of five Airbus A319, three A320 aircraft, and four DHC-8-402Q Dash 8 turboprops.

Cambodia Angkor Air, the flag carrier of  Cambodia, commenced operations in 2009. The airline currently operates a fleet of two Airbus A320, one A321 aircraft, and three ATR 72-500 turboprops.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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China Express Airlines passes IATA safety audit

File photo of a China Express Airlines CRJ-900 (by: byeangel / CC:by-sa)

The Chinese airline China Express Airlines passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

The airline commenced operations in 2006 as a regional operator, based at Chongqing. The airline currently operates a fleet of 31 CRJ-900LR aircraft.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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U.S. starts audit of FAA’s oversight of air carrier maintenance programs

The Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Transportation began an audit of the FAA’s oversight of air carrier maintenance programs.

In 2016, the Ranking Members of the United States House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Subcommittee on Aviation requested that the Office of Inspector General (OIG) review the overall effectiveness of FAA’s oversight of air carrier maintenance programs.
The Congressmen questioned whether FAA demonstrates a sustained ability in its oversight role to account for mergers, rapid expansion, cost cutting, and other factors that could affect air carriers’ decisions about maintenance. They were particularly concerned about whether corrective actions taken by air carriers actually address root causes of maintenance lapses.

The OIG’s objectives for the audit are to assess (1) FAA’s oversight of air carrier maintenance programs and (2) whether FAA considers factors such as mergers, rapid expansion, or cost-cutting initiatives when adjusting its oversight of air carrier maintenance programs.

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Avian Líneas Aéreas passes IATA safety audit

The Argentine airline Avian Líneas Aéreas passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Avian Líneas Aéreas is a regional airline that was founded in the March 2016 as Macair Jet. The airline was rebranded Avian Líneas Aéreas and will start operations on behalf of Avianca Argentina in Q3, 2017 using ATR 72-600 aircraft. Currently the aircraft operated a few BAe Jetstream 32 aircraft.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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FAA proposes $435,000 civil penalty against United Airlines

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes a $435,000 civil penalty against United Airlines for allegedly operating an aircraft that was not in an airworthy condition. 

The FAA alleges that on June 9, 2014, United mechanics replaced a fuel pump pressure switch on a Boeing 787 in response to a problem that a flight crew had documented two days before. However, the airline failed to perform a required inspection of the work before returning the aircraft to service, the agency alleges.

United operated the aircraft on 23 domestic and international passenger flights before performing the required inspection on June 28, 2014, the FAA alleges. Two of those flights allegedly occurred after the FAA had notified United that it had not performed the inspection.

The FAA alleges the aircraft was not airworthy during all 23 of the flights.

United has asked to meet with the FAA to discuss the case.

FAA extends warning for unannounced North Korean missile tests in Pyongyang FIR

Pyongyang FIR (ZKKP) with 132° boundary

Pyongyang FIR (ZKKP) with 132° boundary

The U.S. FAA has extended by a year (until 27 May 2018) their advise to U.S. airlines to exercise caution when flying in the eastern part of North Korean airspace due to possible missile test launches. 

North Korea continues to conduct unannounced launches of short range and intermediate-range ballistic missiles that have the ability to travel beyond 132 degrees east longitude.

For this reason the FAA had already prohibited operations of U.S. aircraft from flying in the Pyongyang FIR (ZKKP) west of 132 degrees east longitude. U.S. operators are advised to use caution when planning for and operating in and around the Pyongyang FIR east of 132 degrees east longitude.

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J-Air (Japan) and Mann Yadanarpon Airlines (Myanmar) pass IATA safety audit

J-Air ERJ-170 (photo: lasta29)

The Japanese airline J-Air and Mann Yadanarpon Airlines from Myanmar both passed the  IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

J-Air is wholly owned regional subsidiary of Japan Airlines – JAL and commenced operations in 1996 as a regional operator. The airline now flies domestic services within Japan with a fleet of 28  aircraft: Five CRJ-200ER jets, 17 Embraer ERJ-170’s and six ERJ-190’s.

Mann Yadanarpon Airlines is a privately owned domestic airline that began operarions in 2014 out of Mandalay Airport, Myanmar. The airline currently operates two ATR 72-600 turboprops.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

EU clears Benin, Mozambique from Air Safety List and adds four airlines

All air carriers from Benin and Mozambique are removed from the EU Air Safety List, while four individual airlines were added.

The European Commission updated the EU Air Safety List, the list of non-European airlines that do not meet international safety standards, and removed all airlines certified in Benin and Mozambique from the list, following further improvements to the aviation safety situation in these countries.
On the other hand, the airlines Med-View (Nigeria), Mustique Airways (St. Vincent and the Grenadines), Aviation Company Urga (Ukraine) and Air Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe) were added to the list due to unaddressed safety deficiencies that were detected by the European Aviation Safety Agency during the assessment for a third country operator authorisation.

Med-View operated a regular service between Lagos and London-Gatwick using a Nigerian registered Boeing 767-300 until November 13, 2016. Effective November 2 the airline began using a Boeing 747-400 operated by Air Atlanta Icelandic.  Air Urga operated on occasional charter flights from Ukraine to EU states. Mustique Airways operated occasional flights to Martinique (France).

Despite the fact that Med-View Airlines was added to the ‘black list’, the airline is on IATA’s IOSA registry. The IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) program is an international evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline.

Following the update, a total of 181 airlines are banned from EU skies:
174 airlines certified in 16 states, due to a lack of safety oversight by the aviation authorities from these states.
Seven individual airlines, based on safety concerns with regard to these airlines themselves: Iran Aseman Airlines (Iran), Iraqi Airways (Iraq) and Blue Wing Airlines (Suriname), Med-View Airlines (Nigeria), Mustique Airways (St Vincent and the Grenadines), Aviation Company Urga (Ukraine) and Air Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe).
An additional six airlines are subject to operational restrictions and can only fly to the EU with specific aircraft types: Afrijet and Nouvelle Air Affaires SN2AG (Gabon), Air Koryo (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), Air Service Comores (the Comoros), Iran Air (Iran) and TAAG Angola Airlines (Angola).

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