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South African CAA suspends CemAir Air Operator Certificates over safety concerns
15 December 2018

South African CAA suspends CemAir Air Operator Certificates over safety concerns

Cemair (Pty) Ltd can no longer operate as an airline or air operator or fly any of its twenty-one aircraft. This follows a decision by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to suspend two  of CemAir’s Air Operator Certificates (AOCs).

The affected AOCs relate to the operator’s permits issued under Part 121 and Part 135 of the Civil Aviation Regulations. The suspension became effective on December 13, 2018.
In addition, the SACAA’s audit team has also recommended to the Director of Civil Aviation to revoke CemAir’s AOCs.
The SACAA’s decision follows a thorough review of CemAir’s Corrective Action Plan (CAP), which sought to address the initial findings unveiled during the annual renewal audit. The CAP or proposed remedial actions by CemAir were found to be unsatisfactory and did not adequately address the findings that were initially raised. In addition records in the SACAA’s possession demonstrated that CemAir has been operating some aircraft outside of permissible loading (weight and balance) limits.
The SACAA also noted with concern that despite being issued with a Prohibition Order, CemAir knowingly continued to fly their aircraft in contravention of the applicable regulatory prescripts.

More info:

EASA extends validity of conflict zone warning for Yemen to 23 May 2019.

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletin for Yemen to 23 May 2019.

  • CZIB-2017-07R3: Airspace of Yemen – Sana’a Flight Information Region

The previous extension of the warning was published on 3 September 2018 with a validity until 28 February 2019. The Bulletin references an updated German Notam, which adds the “operations by unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)” to the potential risks in the Sana’a FIR.

 

Switzerland grounds Ju-52 aircraft over severe structural damage to wing spars

The Federal Office of Civil Aviation FOCA has immediately issued a temporary ban on flights for the Ju-52 Ju-Air stationed in Dübendorf. Inspection of the wreck of the Ju-52 crashed on 4 August 2018 by the Swiss Safety Investigation Board (SUST) revealed severe structural damage to the wing spars. These could not be detected during normal maintenance and inspection. According to current knowledge, however, they are not related to the crash on 4 August. The technical investigations at the SUST are not yet completed.

Following the crash of a Ju-Air Junkers Ju-52 three-engined aircraft on August 4, 2018, the airline restarted operations on August 17 with the two remaining aircraft of the same type. Since there were no indications of general technical defects at this time, the FOCA had approved the resumption of flight operations in compliance with precautionary measures. This also included that the FOCA would announce a flight ban on new findings from the ongoing safety investigations.

Meanwhile, the first results of the investigation by the Swiss TSB were published in the form of an interim report. There is still no evidence that a serious technical problem led to the accident with 20 fatalities. The investigation of the wreck, however, revealed severe structural damage in the form of cracks and corrosion on the main spar, the supporting element of the aircraft wing, and other parts of the aircraft. This damage was hidden during normal inspections and maintenance and could only be determined from the debris.

Since the two Ju-52 HB-HOP and HB-HOS stationed in Dübendorf correspond in age as well as in hours of operation to the crashed machine, it must be ensured that both aircraft do not show this damage. Until this proof has been provided or any damage has been remedied, these two Ju-52s may not be flown for the time being.

 

EASA withdraws Conflict Zone Information Bulletin for North Korea

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) withdrew its Conflict Zone Information Bulletin (CZIB-2017-06R2) for the North Korean Pyongyang Flight Information Region on October 26, 2018.

Meanwhile, the FAA on 18 September extended their warning to prohibit certain flights in North Korean airspace.

 

EASA extended Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) updated and extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Somalia to 24 April 2019.

 

China United Airlines and Canaryfly pass IATA safety audit

China United Airlines and Canaryfly both passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

China United Airlines is a Chinese budget carrier based at Beijing Nanyuan Airport. It started operating flights in 1986 as a civil branch of the Chinese Army and was relaunched in 2005 with Shanghai Airlines as its largest stakeholder.
The airline now operates eight Boeing 737-700’s and 36 Boeing 737-800’s.

Canaryfly is a Spanish regional airline that operates out of Gran Canaria Airport, Canary Islands. The airline was established in 2010 and operates five ATR 72-500 turboprops.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Air Guilin passes IATA safety audit

Air Guilin passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Air Guilin is a Chinese airline, based at Guilin Liangjiang International Airport. It started operating flights in 2016 and currently uses 3 Airbus A319-100 aircraft and 8 Airbus A320-200s.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

AirAsia passes IATA safety audit

AirAsia passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

AirAsia is a Malaysian low-cost airline. Its main base is Kuala Lumpur International Airport. It started operating flights in 1996 and currently uses 70 Airbus A320-200 aircraft and 21 Airbus A320neos .

The airline’s affiliates AirAsia X and Indonesia AirAsia are both IOSA registered as well.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

Hong Kong Air Cargo passes IATA safety audit

Hong Kong Air Cargo passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Hong Kong Air Cargo is a cargo airline based at Hong Kong Chek Lap Kok International Airport. The airline is a subsidiary of Hong Kong Airlines. It started operating in 2016 and uses three Airbus A330-200F aircraft.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

JU-Air will resume Ju-52 flights on 17 August with government-mandated safety measures in place

Swiss operator JU-Air stated that it would resume flights using their historic Junkers Ju-52/3m aircraft starting August 17, 2018.

Operations had been voluntarily suspended after the fatal accident on August 4 in which all 20 occupants were killed. The Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA) allows operations to be conducted since the investigation by the STSB has not yet brought to light any technical problems with the accident aircraft.

However, JU-Air first has to comply with the precautionary measures of the FOCA to commence flight operations. First, the FOCA requires that, for the time being, a minimum altitude above the legal minimum altitude be maintained. Secondly, JU-Air’s aircraft now have to carry a GPS data recorder that records every flight and allows subsequent assessment of the route. Third, the passengers should also remain strapped during the flight and not be able to circulate freely in the aircraft. This also applies to visits to the cockpit during the flight.

These precautionary measures must be implemented by JU-Air before commencing flight operations. JU-Air has already assured the FOCA that it will implement these requirements accordingly.